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Wire-haired Jack Russell terrier
Date Issued: 2010-04-30
Postage Value: 44 cents

Commemorative issue
Adopt a Shelter Pet
Wire-haired Jack Russell terrier

The Animal Rescue: Adopt a Shelter Pet sheet of com¬memorative stamps feature photographs of 10 sheltered pets — five cats and five dogs. This sheet of stamps is part of the Postal Service’s long-term commitment to raising awareness of important social issues. The Animal Rescue: Adopt a Shelter Pet commem¬orative stamps raise awareness of the importance of adopting companion animals from shelters to help prevent the senseless euthanizing of millions of animals every year.
In the early and mid-1980s, psychologists and wanna-bes flooded the market with self-help books to encourage people to be assertive without being aggressive, to stand up for themselves, to stop acting like wimps in their relationships. The Jack Russell Terrier never needed such counsel.

The scrappy little dog popularized in television comedies and commercials and on the big screen is the epitome of the assertive and energetic personality: he's bold, brash, vigorous, and supremely self-confident, characteristics that often stun owners who thought they were purchasing a couch potato or a lap dog.

The breed history is wrapped in legend. Named for Parson Jack Russell, a hard-drinking, hard-riding hunter of the 1850-70s, the dog is from the same basic stock as the AKC-registered Wire-haired Fox Terrier1. The parson favored a dog that was bold enough to follow the fox into its earthen den but not so aggressive that it would kill the quarry. His terrier was trained to find and flush the fox for the houndsmen and their foxhounds; it was a flexible dog, able to maneuver in underground dens, mostly white so it could be easily seen, and of the same flamboyant character as the parson himself.

Breed fanciers describe their favorite as a strain of fox terrier, kept pure from the early days, much as fanciers of some hunting breeds have continued field strains of their breeds that today differ from the dogs seen in the show ring

Topic: Dogs (59)  

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